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Anton

"Bude" ist right term. It is the medieval word for a small market stand. A barrel, a piece of wood and : voilá, a "Bude".
That's what i have heared at Wdr5 a couple of month ago :-)

renke

Trinkhallen are not open on sunday because of the non-christian background of the owners, but some types of business are excluded from the strict Ladenschlussgesetz (and similar Bundesländer laws).

Markus Schäfer

Here in the Ruhrpott the Trinkhalle is usually called 'Bude'.

Wenzel

some interesting information about the history of Trinkhallen.
http://www.zeit.de/2012/02/Deutschlandkarte-Trinkhallen

Ney

And in the Ruhrgebiet, the colloquial term is often "Bude".
In the olden days, when all other shops closed 6:30 p.m.,
those Trinkhallen (etc.) seemed to flourish a bit more than
nowadays...

Stefan

Not everywhere in the west, though. In Köln we call them Kiosk.

LaHaine

Trinkhalle is a very west German word, here in Berlin it is called Späti.

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