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Emma Broadfoot

John Coventry I was I am I will be. This is the best selling book that I have read for some time.
Is it justifiable to torture a terrorist to save hundreds of people who would otherwise be killed ?
The " Killing" feature of this book is the Epilogue,that for the first time (that I am aware of),shows the real inside goings on within Badder Meinhof.

me.yahoo.com/a/70867Nll1Z9MQgObst9wEIRlqYqV3DsTGA--

I have always have an interest in the RAF/Baader meinhof terrorism and have been following the trial of Becker. Jackie Stallone and Family recommended a new book just out,Pre-publication Ben bella Books of John Coventry's " I was, I am, I will be". I got it via Amazon/Kindle. Anyhow,This book puts a whole new angle on things.
The book shows evidence that the German Government allowed RAF/Baader Meinhof to assassinate the Chief Prosecutor,it shows a 30 year cover up and the evidence is shattering. They have got One man, one witness ,who knew the answers and held the secrets for over 30 years now exposes this conspiracy for the first time.
It shows that RAF terrorist Becker was not even in Germany on the day of the shooting.
For the first time the whereabouts of a apartment in Amsterdam where Badder Meinhof met in secret.
The intelligence services meetings with Becker and why the Germans, British and Americans let the assassination go ahead.
So now we know for the first time the names, the places and all the connections.
This is wild,but the proof in the book is beyond doubt.
I had no idea that the German Government had a MOLE inside the RAF/ Baader meinhof.

martin

@mark,

the statistics i have list 3 convictions under § 140 for 1996, 2 for 1998 and 4 for 2000.

That's about the same order of magnitude as the number of people shot at the former Iron Curtain each year. Proves to me that the system works in both cases.

mark

martin, i don't want to disturb your very informed view of german society and criminal law too much, but in § 140 the "disturbance of the peace" is not the crime. "disturbance of the peace" is a prerequisite to be charged for the actual crimes that § 140 lists, namely approval of a number of other crimes, including the preparation of an "aggressive war", murder, genocide or rape. approval of such crimes becomes a crime when it is undertaken in a way that disturbs "the public peace", that is publicly in a way that is offensive to the well-being of society. i agree that this is all very vague and one can question the validity of such a concept, but the provision has little to no effect on the openness of public debate in germany. the statistics i have list 3 convictions under § 140 for 1996, 2 for 1998 and 4 for 2000.

on the other hand one should keep in mind that to my knowledge every society makes value-based judgements on the extent of the freedom of speech. this includes the US of A, where freedom of speech, despite the famous first amendment, isn't without limits (see eric barendt, freedom of speech, oxford 2005, pp. 48-55).

martin

James W., thank you for proving Godwin's law. For everyone else that's reading this and is interested in a genuine discussion: Article 140 includes such dubious crimes as "Disturbance of the Public Peace", or rather just the approval of it. Disturbance of the Public Peace is a typical vague bullshit concept created to just generally keep the masses in check. It must have been something along those lines that they justified the persecution (there we go again) of "Mescalero" with.

James W.

martin, let me get this straight: each time you want to say something you have to first check yourself to make sure you don't accidentally yell out "Heil Hitler" or "Auschwitz didn't happen"? I think you are just slightly exaggerating the effects of the laws against Volksverhetzung. Holger Voss wasn't sentenced, by the way.

martin

@mark,

hello, this is the martin-guy speaking. I believe that you can't have partial free speech just like you can't be partially pregnant. Fact is, each time you want to open your mouth while within the confines of German jurisdiction, you have to run your thoughts against a list of forbidden things before you voice them. That has the effect that people align themselves upfront with the officially proclaimed viewpoints of the establishment.

Btw, note to self: Can you 'persecute' free speech? I guess you can only 'persecute' people. But I guess you get my point.

mark

reading comments from this martin-guy on this blog here, i get the feeling i must be living in germany under a terrible proto-fascist religious dictatorship without the right to free speech. thank god (ha!) there's somebody so enlightened to point this out to me, cos indoctrinated as i am - i would never have noticed.

martin

Since I don't subscribe to the rag that is Sueddeutsche, I don't know whether they balanced young Buback's commentary with some other articles, but the reporting on this blog is pretty one-sided. For anyone to get an impression on the establishment that old Buback was defending, read any book by investigative undercover journalist Guenther Walraff who was pretty active during those times.

Young Buback's language of blanket accusations of "'blindness', arrogance and perversion" certainly reflects the authoritarian stance of his father's circles that don't need to discuss, just accuse. "Crimes against the state" is a term right out of totalitarian propaganda.

Also, Andrew, there is no need to put the crime of "praising criminal activity" in quotes, as that is an actual crime according to article 140 of the German Penal code, one of the many holes that make free speech in Germany like a Swiss cheese. This law is also readily enforced today, as the case of Holger Voss has shown, a case that revealed some interesting complicity on the part of Deutsche Telekom in persecuting free speech.

Der ____weiler

That Mescalero article is quite interesting, because it is so two-faced.

Fortunatelt, it is online: http://www.uni-muenster.de/UniGAL/bukopm/buback.html

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